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RobertDarbyGoogled

Page history last edited by R H Johnston 8 years, 10 months ago

Robert Darby, Highwayman, executed 1752, following a robbery at Blackwater Heath, Surrey, 29 July 1751

page contributed by Richard Johnston, 23 Oct 2011, revised 28.10.2011, 29.10.2011, 30.10.2011, 13.11.2011.  This page started with what could be obtained by an internet search, but has since been expanded with material from other sources.

 

Robert Darby was "the son of a Hampshire clergyman", and hence fits into the romantic notion of the "gentleman highwayman" (see a relevant book on gentlemen criminals).  He had committed a number of robberies, including one for which he was tried and acquited at Winchester Assizes ca1751, and was caught on a vessel at Gravesend, tried at Kingston assizes, and executed following a mail robbery on Blackwater Heath (i.e on the A30 where Camberley is now), Surrey   He was executed at or near the place of this robbery, and "hung in chains" - i.e with his dead body left on display on a gibbet for a lengthy period afterwards.

 

Baptism Robert Darby

The designation of Robert Darby as being "of Wimbourne Minster" on the marriage licence below, and his age, makes it probable that he was the Robert Darby who was baptised at Wimborne Minster 16 Jul 1728, the son of William Darby (IGI).  That in turn makes it probable that his father was Rev William Darby (CCEd Person ID: 13193), who was educated at All Souls, Oxford, and Rector of  Singleton, Hampshire (08/02/1715 - 14/06/1727), and later of Woodsford, Dorset (12/05/1729 - 08/05/1753 ).

 

Marriage: Robert Darby to Mary Clark

Robert Darby married Mary Clark 20 June 1751 at Send and Ripley, Surrey.(IGI)  {NB no marriage recorded in Surrey Marriage index for Farnham, and Robert Darby is a gentleman - hence the right status)

They married by licence (Commissary Court Surrey: allegations for marriage licenses.):

19 June, 1751. Robert Derby of Wimbourne Minster, co. Dorset,
gentleman, bachelor, 23, and Mary Clark of Waverley, co. Surrey,
spinster, 24 ; at Ripley or Send. Thomas Lawford of Holy Trinity,
Guldeford, husbandman, 2nd s. Both sign.

(Reference: http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/eng-diocese-commissary-court-surrey/allegations-for-marriage-licences-issued-between-1673-1770-with-an-appendix-of--rru/page-33-allegations-for-marriage-licences-issued-between-1673-1770-with-an-appendix-of--rru.shtml

 

(Mary possibly remarried at Farnham, 1 Jan 1758:  Mary DERBY to Thomas BUNCH at Farnham 1 Jan 1758 (Surrey Marriage index))

 

 

From London Evening Post 28-30 July 1751.

 

Yesterday morning, between One and Two o'Clock, the Post-Boy with the Western Mail was stopp'd on Black-Water-Heath by a single Highwayman, who took from him the Mail, and charg'd him not to stir 'till he was out of Sight, or he would blow his Brains out, which the Boy complaied with, and then came forward to London: In the Way he found two of the Bags, viz. Andover and Sherborne, and brought them to the Office; and about Six in the Evening the Honiton and Tiverton Bags were also brought to the same place  (Reference London Evening Post 28-30 July 1751.)

 

From The London magazine, and monthly chronologer, July 1751, p381

Monday 29.

This morning between 1 and 2 o'clock the western mail was robbed on Black-water-heath of all the bags therein except two, supposed by the same highwayman that robbed the Cirencester mail in April last. The reward for taking him on conviction is 200l. besides that by act of parliament."

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=oF9FAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA381&ots=RzIoY78lq-&dq=blackwater%20heath%20%22western%20mail%22&pg=PA381#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

From London Daily Advertiser, 30 July 1751

Yesterday Morning, between one and two o'Clock, as the Post-Boy was coming with the Western Mail to Town, he was, on Blackwater-heath, attacked by a single Highwayman, well mounted, who, when he came up to him, commanded him to stand, which he refusing, he presented a Pistol, and swore, if he did not comply, he would shoot him; and immediately ordered him to dismount, which he found himself obliged to comply with.  he gave the Boy two Shillings to drink his Health, who walking on, in hopes, if not to get the Bags, to find his Horse, in his way took up two of them; and going farther, found his Horse, on which he mounted, and rode to Bagshot, where he was immediately ordered with the two Bags to London, to acquaint the Post-Master-General of the Affair. (Reference London Daily Advertiser, 30 July 1751)

 

From the London Gazette, notice stopping money draughts stolen in the robbery:

 

London, July 29, 1751.
T A K E N out of the Western Mail that was this Day robbed, the following Draughts.
Penryn, July 18, 1751. Walter Reed, jun.to John Glanvill, Esq; on Joshua Channing} 50L 0s 0d
Leghorn, June 11, 1751. Holder and Jermy, first Bill to their own Order, on George Prescot, Esq ] 88L 2s 5d
Truro, July 18, 1751. William Lemon to John Glanvill, Esq; on Furstenau and Schroder, }108L 12s 7d
The above Draughts were last endorsed by John Glanvill to John Badcock, Esq; or Order.
In the same Cover was enclosed the first Halfs of two Bank Notes, No 299, and No C 140. for 30 l. each.
This is to inform all Persons, that Acceptance and Payment of tbe said Draughts are stopped ; and if any Attempt should be made to negociate either of them, please to give immediate Notice to Mr. John Badcock, in Ludgate-street, London,

(Reference:

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/9083/pages/4/page.pdf

 

From London Gazette, No9080, 30 Jul-3 Aug 1751, p2-3  (NB the same notice appeared in issue No 9079)

July 29, 1751.

General Post Office.

Whereas the Post-Boy bringing the West Mail to this Office, was this Morning, between One and Two of the Clock, on Black Water Heath, attacked and robbed, by a single Highwayman, mounted on a Brown Horse or Mare, who took out of the said Mail, and carried off the following Bags of Letters, viz.

 

Plymouth,

Exeter,

Truro,

St. Columb,

Bodmin,

Camelford,

Oakhampton,

Barnstaple,

Totnes,

Ashburton,

Dartmouth,

Launceston,

Honiton,

Tiverton,

Crewkerne,

Taunton,

Wellington,

Minehead,

/

Chard,

Ilminster,

Shaftesbury,

Salisbury,

Dorchester,

Weymouth,

Blandford,

Lyme,

Axminster,

Bridport,

Wimborne,

Christchurch,

Pool,

Cranborne,

Fordingbridge,

Ringwood,

Basingstoke, and

Whitchurch.

/

The Person who committed this Robbery, was a middle sized Man, and had on a brown Duffle Surtout Coat and rode on a Brown Horse of Mare, about Fourteen Hands high.

 

This therefore is to give Notice, That whoever shall apprehend and convict, or cause to be apprehended and convicted, the Person who committed this Robbery, will be entitled to a Reward of Two Hundred Pounds, over and above the Reward given by Act of Parliament for apprehending of Highwaymen: Or if any Person, or Persons, whether Accomplice in the said Robbery, or knowing thereof, shall make Discovery, whereby the Person, who committed the same, shall be apprehended and brought to Justice, such Discoverer, or Discoverers, will, upon Conviction of the Party, be intitled to the same Reward of Two Hundred Pounds, and also have his Majesty's most gracious Pardon.

By Command of the Post-Master General;

Secretary, George Shelvocke, 

Reference: http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/9080/pages/2/page.pdf and http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/9080/pages/3/page.pdf

 

 

From The London magazine, or, Gentleman's monthly intelligencer, Volume 20  By Isaac Kimber, Edward Kimber, August 1751: page 377:

 

"On the 29th, between one and two in the morning, as the post-boy was coming with the Western mail to town, he was, on Blackwater-heath, attacked by a single highwayman, well mounted, who, when he came up to him, commanded him to stand, which he refusing, he presented a pistol, and swore, if he did not comply, he would shoot him; and immediately ordered him to dismount, and then took away 36 bags. He gave the boy two shillings to drink his health, who walking on, in hopes, if not to get the bags, to find his horse, in his way he took up two of them ; and going farther found his horse, on which he mounted, and rode to Bagshot, where he was immediately ordered with the two bags to London, to acquaint the post master general of the affair. The reward for taking the robber, on conviction, is 200l. over and above that given by act of parliament, for apprehending of highwaymen."  (Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=NvwqAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA377&ots=Eaqy6evBlY&dq=%22blackwater%20heath%22%20%22western%20mail22&pg=PA377#v=onepage&q=%22blackwater%20heath%22%20%22western%20mail%22&f=false

 

 

From London Evening-Post, August 8, 1751

Aug. 8, 1751.

GENERAL POST-OFFICE.

WHEREAS the Post-Boy, bringing the West Mail to this Office, on Monday the 29th of July last was, the same Morning, between One and Two o'Clock, attack'd and robb'd on Black-Water-Heath, by a single Highwayman, mounted on a Brown Horse or Mare, about fourteen Hands high, who took out of the said Mail, and carried off the following Bags of Letters, viz.

 

Plymouth,

Exeter,

Truro,

St. Columb,

Bodmin,

Camelford,

Oakhampton,

Barnstaple,

Totness,

Ashburton,

Dartmounth,

Launceston,

/

Crewkerne,

Taunton,

Wellington,

Minehead,

Chard,

Ilminster,

Shaftesbury,

Salisbury,

Dorchester,

Weymouth,

Blandford,

/

Lyme,

Axminster,

Bridport,

Wimborne,

Christchurch,

Pool,

Cranburn,

Fordingbridge,

Ringwood,

Basingstoke, and

Whitchurch.

/

The Person who committed this Robbery has gone by the several Names of Robert Darby, alias Jones, has lately lived at Shepperton in Middlesex, is a lusty well set Man, about five Feet nine or ten Inches high, of about twenty-three or twenty-four Years of Age, of a ruddy Complexion, has a large Scar on the left Side of his Face, near the Ear, had on, when he was seen last, a Blue-grey Coat with Silver Vellum Button-holes, a brown short Bob Wig, a Buff colour'd Cloth Waistcoat laced with Silver, a large Silver laced Hat, and wore a Pair of Buckskin Breeches, and Silver Shoe-Buckles.

 

This therefore is to give Notice, that whoever shall apprehend and convict, or cause to be apprehended and convicted, the Person who committed this Robbery, wil[sic] be intitled to a Reward of Two Hundred Pounds, over and above the Reward given by Act of Parliament for apprehending of Highwaymen: Or if any Person, or Persons, whether Accomplice in the said Robbery, or knowing thereof, shall make Discovery, whereby the Person, who committed the same, shall be apprehended and brought to Justice, such Discoverer, or Discoverers, will, upon Conviction of the Party, be intitled to the same Reward of Two Hundred Pounds, and also have his Majesty's most gracious Pardon.

(Reference: London Evening-Post, August 8, 1751)

 

From The London magazine, or, Gentleman's monthly intelligencer, Volume 20, August 1751, page 379:  

 

Thursday, 8. One Robert Darby, alias Jones, was taken at Gravesend, as he was endeavouring to get a passage to France, on suspicion of his being the person who robbed the Western-mail on July 19 last. (See p. 377.) On Saturday he was brought to town, and examined at Pontac's by Mr. alderman Rawlinson, who committed him to the Poultry-counter for further examination. His wife was with him, and she was committed to Woodstreet-counter. On Monday he was brought to the general post office, and examined at the board, where were present Mr alderman Winterbottom and Mr. alderman Rawlinson, and after some time he was remanded back to the Counter for further examination, the post-boy not being positive to his person or dress. But the next day he was examined again, and committed to Newgate ; but his wife was discharged.

 

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=aPwRAAAAYAAJ&dq=Robert%20Darby%20Kingston%20trial&pg=PA379#v=onepage&q=Robert%20Darby%20Kingston%20trial&f=false

 

From the London Penny Post, Friday August 9, to Monday August 12, 1751:

"Last Thursday Night, about Ten o'Clock, Robert Darby alais Jones, who robb'd the Western Mail on Blackwater Heath on Monday the 29th of July last, was taken at Gravesend, by an Acquaintance of his, who had pursued him from Place to Place for six Days successively: The first Day he was so near being taken, that he was obliged to leave the Cloaths he robbed the Mail in behind him, and which the boy has since swore to. When taken he appeared in the Dress of a Foreigner, with a feather'd Hat, and was endeavouring to get a Passage from thence to France, not thinking it so safe to go to Dover."  (Reference:  

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dutillieul/ZOtherPapers/LMPPAug91751.html

 

From Whitehall Evening Post, 10-13 August, 1751:

Last Saturday Robert Darby (who is suspected to have robbed the Western Mail on the 29th of July last, was brought to Town from Gravesend, and examined at Pontac's by Alderman Rawlinson, who committed him to the Pultry Compter for further Examination.  His Wife was with him, and she was committed to Woodstreet Compter; he is a genteel Man, and very well dressed about twenty-three Years of Age, and came of a very good Famnily, his father is a Clergyman.  He says he has been some time at Sea, but was lately in the Excise at Farnham in Surry, where jhe married his Wife. Upon his Examination he was searched, but nothing material was found upon him.

Yesterday about Noon Darby, who was taken up at Gravesend on Suspicion of robbing the Western Mail, was brought to the General-Post-Office in a Coach from the Poultry-Compter, and examined at the Board; there were present Mt Alderman Rawlinson and Mr Alderman Winterbottom, and after some time jhe was remanded back for further Examination, the Post-Boy not being positive to his Person or Dress.

(Reference: Whitehall Evening Post, 10-13 August, 1751)

 

 

From the Gentleman's magazine Vol 21, p376:

 

Monday 12 [August]

 

Robert Darby, apprehended the 8th on board a vessel off Gravesend, on suspicion of robbing the western mail on July 29, was after 3 examinations (the postboy not positively swearing to him, but that the robber wore a brown surtout coat, such as Darby was prov'd to borrow the evening before) committed to Newgate.  He goes very genteel, is the son of a worthy divine in Hampshire, has committed several robberies, and was try'd at last Winchester assizes, but aquitted for want of evidence.

 

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=E0QDAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA376&ots=vg3yDEOoit&dq=Gentlemans%20magazine%20p376%201751&pg=PA376#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

From The Gentleman's magazine, Volume 163,  By John Nichols, 1838, p151, Memorable events of 1751:

 

"July 29. Western Mail robb'd on Black Water Heath by a Highwayman, and carried off the Letters, &c. &c.

"Aug. 19. The Letters taken out of the Western Mail were brought to the Post Office all open'd.

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=CaTPAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA151&ots=Z3zxlWW7yP&dq=blackwater%20heath%20%22western%20mail%22&pg=PA151#v=onepage&q&f=false

(NB a contemporary reference to the recovery of the letters on Aug 19 was searched for in the 1751 Gentleman's magazine, but not found)

 

City of London Sessions

City of London Sessions: Sessions Papers - Justices' Working Documents 

13th September 1751

The King agt. Robert Derby

John Ismay of the General Post officer in the City of
London Gentleman maketh Oath that the Offence with
which Robert Derby Stands charged is for robbing the
West Mail, on the 29th. of July 1751 And this Deponent
further saith that he hath heard and verily believes that
the said Robbery was committed on Blackwater Heath
in the County of Surry .

Sworn at Justice Hall in
the Old Bailey the 13th.
Septr. 1751 . By the Court

John Ismay

(Reference:

http://www.londonlives.org/browse.jsp?div=LMSLPS15062PS150620099

Image:

http://hri.shef.ac.uk/san/pl/SL/PS/LMSLPS15062/LMSLPS150620099.jpg

See also 

http://www.ismayons.com/court/quarter.htm

 

 

 

From The London magazine; or, Gentleman's monthly intelligencer, Volume 21, p189, April 1752

Friday, Arpil[sic] 3. The assizes ended at Kingston for the county of Surrey, when 12 men and 2 women received sentence of death, viz. Robert Darby for robbing the Western mail, July 29 last, on Black-Water-Heath;...

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=glEDAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA189&ots=dnqJ-yYCcG&dq=blackwater%20heath%20%22western%20mail%22&pg=PA189#v=onepage&q=blackwater%20heath%20%22western%20mail%22&f=false

 

Gentleman's magazine and historical chronicle, Volume 22, April 1752:

 

Friday 3 {April]. Were condemn'd at Kingston assizes for Surry, ... Robert Darby, otherwise Jones, for robbing the western mail [See vol. xxi. p. 376.]  

 

—On the trial of Darby it appeared that he confessed in Newgate, that when he was taken at Gravesend, his wife, who was with him, had bank notes quilted in her stays to the value of 600/. that were in the western mail

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=50g3AAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA188&ots=9yDCKPcw34&dq=Robert%20Darby%201752&pg=PA188#v=onepage&q=Robert%20Darby%201752&f=false

 

From Covent-Garden Journal, April  7, 1752:

On Friday last the Assizes held at Kingston upon Thames, in and for the County of Surry, ended, when the following Fourteen Criminals received Sentence of Death, viz:

....

Robert Darby, otherwise Jones, attainted for robbing the Western Mail on Black-water-Heath, in July last.

...

The Judge reprieved the last Seven before he left the Town; Darby was brought back to the New Gaol, Southwark, under a Guard of Soldiers, and will be executed at Kennington Common; his Body will be afterwards carried to Blackwater-Heath, and there hung in Chains.The other Six, the Keeper, at the Request of the principal Inhabitants of Kingston, left there in order to be executed on a new gallows, intended to be erected abolut two Miles beyond the Town from London for that Purpose.  L.G.

On the Trial of Darby it appeared, that he confessed in Newgate, that at the Time he was taken at Gravesend, his Wife, who was with him, ...[more follows - cut off]

(Reference: Covent-Garden Journal, April  7, 1752)

 

From Source unknown - possibly same as above viz: Covent-Garden Journal, April  7, 1752 -CHECK:

His wife had £600 taken from the Mail quilted into her stays.

(Reference: source unknown - possibly same as above viz: Covent-Garden Journal, April  7, 1752 -CHECK)

 

From The Westminster magazine (by Lancelot Povertystruck). By Lancelot Povertystruck (pseud.), p182 11 April 1752:

 

On Friday Se'ennight the Assizes held at Kingston upon Thames, in and for the County of Surry, ended, when the following 14 Crimninals received Sentence of Death, viz.
....
Robert Darby, otherwise Jones, attainted for robbing the Western Mail on Blackwater Heath, in July last.

(Reference:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-dRbAAAAQAAJ&lpg=PA182&ots=FdpT0YD8Xq&dq=%22Robert%20Darby%22%20robber&pg=PA182#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

 

Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th April 1752

{This deals with the trial of William Darby (brother of Robert Darby) for his role as accessory after the fact and gives William Darby's occupation etc., and from this we also discover that Robert Darby's wife was called Mary.  It seems probable that both the witnesses in this case had turned King's evidence in order to save themselves from prosecution for their parts as accessories to Robert Darby's crime. An online paper useful for interpreting reports of trials of this period is here}

 

See original 274. (M.)   William Darby , was indicted as an accessary after a felony committed by his brother,   Robert Darby , in robbing the western Mail, July 29, and was in due form and manner tried and convicted thereof at Kingston upon Thames, March 31; he, the said William, did, on the 14th of October , unlawfully and knowingly receive, comfort, aid and abet the said   Robert Darby , &c .

 

John Saunderson produces the copy of the record of the conviction of  Robert Darby ; it is read, and compared with the Indictment.

 

Francis Price Newham . I have been near two years apprentice to the prisoner: he is a chymist , opposite Southampton-street in Holborn: about the latter end of September, he asked me to go with him, he got me a horse, and boots, we took horse about five in the evening, I can't tell the day, we went over Westminster-Bridge, to Kingston,  from thence to Edgham, we staid there at the Red-Lion, about half an hour: then we rode across the heath pretty fast, we got to a hedge,

it was pretty dark then, it was moon light, the day was shut in, he said he had rather it was dark than light: he got off his horse and went through the hedge, and staid about half an hour, and bro't a coarse linnen bag, tied up together, I think it would hold near a bushel, it was not very heavy in proportion to the bigness : he desired me to buckle it on my saddle, there were things in it, and cover it with my great coat, I did, and we rode directly to London, quite a different way from that we went, we returned through Hounslow, and got to master's house about ten o'clock that night, he took the bag from me and set it down by the door, and when the man open'd the door and was gone, master carried the bag in privately: master sent me away with the horses: I don't know in what manner he disposed of it:   Robert Darby 's wife was in the house at the time of our going out, and I saw her in the house when we return'd. Master desired me never to speak of it.

 

Mary Darby . I was at the prisoner's house in last September, I can't tell the day particularly; he is brother to my husband, Robert Darby, I was present in Newgate when he gave his directions to go to Core [mistranscribed: see original text which reads Cove], for the bag that was taken out of the western Mail, which he said was laid in some ditch, and the prisoner said he would go: about five or six weeks after this, he and the apprentice went, I was at his house when they set out, and returned, which was about nine or ten o'clock, I saw nothing that night, the next day there was a particular smell of burnt paper in his own chamber, where I saw the remains of paper that had been burnt ; a few days after that he ordered me to bring a candle and light him in the shop, he took out a coarse sacking bag and brought it into the parlour, I followed him, he sat down by the fire, and took out some papers and letters sealed up, he broke the seals and open'd them, I saw him open to the value of twenty, I believe, they were all very wet, some of them were so wet he could not open them, them he put in the fire without, he might put in the quantity of a peck; in one letter there was two little bits of paper, I asked him what they were? he said they were no bank notes, but notes of hand, them and all the letters he put into the fire: I found some bank notes under   Robert Darby 's bed, I concealed them in a necessary-house at Gravesend, I told the prisoner of them, he said he would go and look for them for the safety of his brother; he went, and returned, and said, he could not find them.

 

Prisoner's defence.

I acted a little inadvertently, in order to preserve the reputation of my family, and save my brother's life. I should be glad to know whether or as any one here would not have done the same in such a case.

 

Acquitted .

But detained to be tried upon another indictment.

 

(Reference:

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?path=sessionsPapers%2F17520408.xml

Image:

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/images.jsp?doc=175204080037

 

From Read’s Weekly Journal, April 18, 1752

The same Day William Darby was tried, for being an Accessary after the Fact to his Brother, convicted of robbing the Mail; and, after a long Hearing, was acquitted of the Indictment, and discharged. But we hear an Indictment is to be preferred against him for a Misdemeanor. He has given 6000l. Bail for his Appearance at the next Sessions.

(Reference: Read’s Weekly Journal, April 18, 1752)

 

From source unknown - CHECK

William Darby, put up £6,000 bail for his own court appearance for "aiding, comforting and receiving his brother after he robbed the Western Mail". (Source unknown  - CHECK)

 

From The London magazine; or, Gentleman's monthly intelligencer, Volume 21, p191, April 1752:

Friday, 24. This morning about six o'clock, Robert Darby, who was convicted the last assizes at Kingston for robbing the Western mail, was conveyed in a coach and four from the New-goal, attended by a party of horse grenadiers, to Blackwater-heath, and executed pursuant to his sentence. He is hung in chains at the said place. (Refgerence:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=glEDAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA191&ots=dnqJ-yYyhM&dq=%22blackwater%20heath%22%20%22western%20mail%22&pg=PA191#v=onepage&q=%22blackwater%20heath%22%20%22western%20mail%22&f=false

 

From London Daily Advertiser, April 25, 1752:

Yesterday Morning about six o'Clock, Robert Darby, who was convicted the last Assizes at Kingston for robbing the Western Mail, was conveyed in a Coach and Four from the New Gaol, attended by a Party of Horse Grenadiers, to Blackwater Heath, and executed pursuant to his Sentence.  He is to be hung in Chains at the said Place.

(Reference: London Daily Advertiser, April 25, 1752)

 

=========================

The following Notices appeared in Newspapers, concerning Pamphlets about the Robert Darby Trial. 

If anyone finds copies these pamphlets please let us know through the website contact address!

 

General Advertiser April 8 1752

 

This Day is publish'd, Price only 4d.

THE Trials of the Prisoners try'd at Kingston Assizes; containing the r[e]markable Trial of Darby, for robbing the Western Mail, and thirteen Capital Convicts; also of the noted Lingard, late Cryer of the Marshalsea Court, for Perjury, being convicted for swearing falsly against Richard Coleman, who was executed innocently for the Murder of Sarah Green. 

Printed for J. Leage, opposite the Queen's Head in the Old-Baily.

 

=============

Read's Weekly Journal April 12 1752:

 

This Day is Published,

By PERMISSION,

(price Six-Pence, )

THE TRIALS of all the Prisoners who were tried at the Assizes held at Kingston upon Thames for the County of Surry, on Tuesday March 31, A pril 1,2 and 3, 1752

Before the Hon Michael Foster, Knt one of his Maj[e]sty's Justices of the Court of King's Bench

In which are the very remarkable Trials at large of ROBERT DARBY, for robbing the Western Mail, and ROBERT LINGARD, for wilful and corrupt Perjury against Richard Coleman, for the Murder of Sarah Green, each of those remarkable Trials lasted near six Hours.

Printed for W. Owen at Temple Bar.

*** As there is a false and spurious Account published of these Trials, the Public are desired to observe they have that printed by Permission for W. Owen.

 

========

 

General Advertiser April 9 1752:

 

Tjhat the Publick may not be imposed upon by false, spurious, and imperfect Accounts

This Morning will be published,

By Permission, (Price only Six-pence )

Containing almost double the Quantity of any Sessions Paper,

THE Trials at Large of all the Prisoners tried at at Kingston upon Thames ;

In which are the very remarkable ones of Darby, for robbing the Western Mail; Lingard, for wilful Perjury against Richard Coleman, who was executed innocerntly for the Murder of Sarah Green; each of these remarkable Trials lasted near six Hours.  Also William Parsons, Lawrence and Richard Smith, two Custom-house Officers for assaulting Thomas Cooper, with an Intent to rob him; John Saunders, Henry Haynes, Charles Edward Smith, Robert Stamper, and Benjamin Mitchell, for the Highway; Alexander McKey, for Coining; John Hamilton, for Forgery; and many other Capital Offences.

Printed for W. Owen at Temple Bar.

Note, The Publick are desired to observe, they have that printed by Permission, for W. Owen.

 

 

The London Chronicle Dec 13-15 [Tu-Th] 1757, p571, near the end of col 1:

Yesterday died Mr Darby, Chemist and Druggist, opposite Southampton
street, Holborn.

 

I have checked all the weblinks, and they work correctly on 25 Oct 2011: PJT 

 

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